What is United by Diversity?

A multiyear focus with the goal of being more deliberate in deepening our conversations to cultivate greater respect, understanding, and celebration of our differences across our community.

The goal of the United by Diversity initiative includes many of the Characteristics of Jesuit Education. These characteristics include, but are not limited to:

  • Lifelong openness to growth
  • Instruction that is centered on education for justice, intellectual formation that develops abilities in students to reason reflectively, logically, and critically.
  • Creating “men for others” by providing students with intellectual, moral, and spiritual formation that will enable them to make a commitment to service and agents of change.
  • A particular concern for the poor

Initiatives

  • Develop courses in cross-cultural communication and cultural competency. These courses focus on helping students look through the “lens” of another person when it comes to different social identities as contained in the School’s Equality of Action Statement of Purpose--race, culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, belief, age, economic status, or disability.
  • Develop programming that provides learning opportunities both inside and outside the classroom for students, parents, faculty, staff and alumni. Possible programs include speakers and “lunch and learns”.
  • Assist with the effort to recruit faculty, staff and students of diverse and varied backgrounds.
  • Provide professional development to faculty and staff around cross-cultural communication and cultural competency.
  • Work with student organizations that have diversity, justice and inclusion as part of their mission and work. The student organization, Diversity Union, empowers students to educate and challenge themselves on issues regarding inclusion, opportunity and justice.
  • United by Diversity promotes self-reflection and critical thinking, place-based and experiential learning and collaborative teaching and learning that meets students where they are. When persuading someone to your way of thinking, St. Ignatius encourages us to “enter through their door, but be sure to leave through your door.”

Advising

Walk-In Wednesdays & Safe Spaces

Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to visit the Office of Multicultural and Inclusion Initiatives located within the Counseling Office on Wednesdays during periods 4-6.

Safe Spaces is a place in which students are able to discuss inclusion and discrimination issues based on race, culture, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, belief, age, economic status and ability.

Appointments can be made for other days of the week with Tom Costello at thomas.costello@uofdjesuit.org.

Events

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Film & Book Suggestions

October Book of the Month


Evicted (2016)

Princeton sociologist, Matthew Desmond, reports on the poorest neighborhoods in Milwaukee. A city that is also one of the most segregated cities in America. Desmond tells the stories of eight families who on a day-to-day basis are on the brink of losing their housing. The alternatives are living in shelters, on a couch with friends or living on the streets. Desmond also examines the business practices of two landlords and their dealings with their tenants. The book demonstrates the importance of decent affordable housing and the consequences of not having it. After all, housing affects how you live and if you live. Housing is the foundation for where your children attend school, reliable public transportation and access to quality health care.


October Film of the Month


4 Little Girls (1997)

The 1998 Spike Lee documentary film tells the story of the September 15, 1963 church bombing at 16th Street Baptist Church that killed four young girls, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley and Addie Mae Collins. The documentary is filled with actual film footage from that time, family photographs and interviews with the girls’ families. The film contains interviews with Reverend Jesse Jackson, Mrs. Coretta Scott King, Andrew Young and a rare interview with former Governor of Alabama, George Wallace.

Watch Trailer


September Film of the Month Recommendation:


Gran Torino (2008)

This Clint Eastwood directed film is set in the Detroit-Grosse Pointe Park area and features St. Ambrose Catholic Church in many of the scenes. Eastwood also plays retired auto worker and Korean War vet Walt Kowalski. Walt is a better, aging man who sees his neighborhood changing with an influx of people from the Hmong community. Walt fills emptiness in his life with beer and home repair, despising the many Asian, Latino and black families in his neighborhood. Walt becomes a reluctant hero when he stands up to the gangbangers who tried to force an Asian teen to steal Walt's treasured car. An unlikely friendship develops between Walt and the teen, as he learns he has more in common with his neighbors than he thought. He begins to see God in everyone and Walt becomes an ally and advocate for his neighbors. The film is about truth, reconciliation and redemption for Walt. Watch the trailer for the film below.


September Books of the Month Recommendation:

September’s books focus on the racial history of Detroit and how history impacts our current regional segregation today. The first book is Thomas J. Sugrue’s, Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequity in Postwar Detroit (2005) and the second book is Kevin Boyle’s, Arc of Justice (2004), that takes the reader through the 1925 trial of Dr. Ossian Sweet.

Sugrue, a native Detroiter and professor at New York University, writes, “Once America's "arsenal of democracy," Detroit is now the symbol of the American urban crisis. In this reappraisal of America’s racial and economic inequalities, Thomas Sugrue asks why Detroit and other industrial cities have become the sites of persistent racialized poverty. He challenges the conventional wisdom that urban decline is the product of the social programs and racial fissures of the 1960s. Weaving together the history of workplaces, unions, civil rights groups, political organizations, and real estate agencies, Sugrue finds the roots of today’s urban poverty in a hidden history of racial violence, discrimination, and deindustrialization that reshaped the American urban landscape after World War II.”

Boyle, a professor at Northwestern University, tells the story of Dr. Ossian Sweet and his family as they moved into a home in an all-white neighborhood. Dr. Sweet, a grandson of a slave, was met with mob violence outside his home. When shots rang out, one of the whites in the mob threatening his family’s lives was accidentally killed. Clarence Darrow defended Dr. Sweet with great eloquence as he implored the jury to base their verdict on fairness and equality. The city has recently undertaken an effort to preserve the home of Dr. Sweet.


We Are All Maroon

9.13.18

The first Campus Conversation for the 2018-19 school year took place on September 13, 2018. Students from all grades participated in discussing how inclusive U of D Jesuit is to them. Students talked about how one’s social identity affects how others perceive them and include them. Their goal is to have a safe and respectful community. The discussion also focused on the importance of having an open and respectful discussion in the classroom on these issues and look to faculty to make this happen.



1.23.18


The first Campus Conversation of the new semester took place on January 23. Diversity Union leaders, Eddie Black, Steve Murphy and Jerry Perret, facilitated a discussion on how socio-economic class divides us. Students pointed out how where you live defines how you live. Many of those who attended shared their own personal experiences. Students agreed that change is possible if they continue to bring awareness of topics related to class, wealth and poverty in our communities.



12.15.17



Students from U of D Jesuit and Loyola High School met over lunch on December 13 to discuss issues related to religion and its importance in our school community, country and the world. Students also discussed the messages they received about religion while growing up and how the media plays a role in affecting our views on religion. The discussion also turned to what happens when we mix politics and religion in our dialogue. Students expressed a desire to learn more about other religions while students in high school.



11.27.17


Leaders of Diversity Union held its monthly Campus Conversation on the topic of free speech, hate speech and hate groups. The discussion focused on what constitutes “hate speech” and “free speech”. Participants emphasized the importance of education and listening to what the other person has to say. While we may disagree on an issue, students felt that an honest and respectful discussion is needed. How one is socialized plays a large part in the views and memberships one holds in their lives. Students connected the discussion to U of D Jesuit’s mission and work of love, compassion and kinship.



11.15.17

Students from U of D Jesuit, Loyola and Cristo Rey met this week to discuss inclusion issues at their schools. This month's meeting was hosted by students from Loyola - Hayden Caddell, Eric Cox II, Dayshawn Reed, and Kendall Wilson. KJ Wilson from Loyola led a discussion on how we all need to wear different "masks" as we go through the day at our schools, homes and communities. You might act a certain way at school and then another way with your friends when you get home. Students learned from each other the struggles in doing so and expressed how they just want to be themselves in all places. Our next meeting is December 13 at U of D Jesuit.



10.10.17



On October 10, students from Loyola High School, Cristo Rey High School and University of Detroit Jesuit High School gathered for lunch and discussion at Cristo Rey. Students discussed the importance of their own social identities and how those identities factor into their socialization as young adults. The group meets three times this semester and three times next semester. Every school takes a turn in hosting the lunch meeting. The goal is to equip students with the tools to help them facilitate intergroup dialogue on issues of inclusion on their respective high school campuses. U-D Jesuit was represented by juniors, Eddie Black and Steve Murphy, and senior, Jerry Perret.



9.27.17

The student organization, Diversity Union, held a campus conversation during periods four through six on September 27. Student leaders asked those who attended,

What do we value at U of D Jesuit?
How do we grow our culture?
What are the barriers to inclusion?
What do we need to do to break down those barriers?

The discussion was thoughtful and engaging, and the leaders of Diversity Union left with a number of ideas and thoughts about inclusion, diversity and how we can break down what separates us.

Brotherhood, companionship, diversity, faith, service and justice where mentioned as concepts we value at U of D Jesuit. Education, conversation and getting to know one another were discussed as ways to break down the barriers that separate us.

One student stated, “We need to push ourselves to get to know one another.”

Diversity Union plans to hold these campus conversations on a regular basis with the goal of making our community a more inclusive one.

Diversity Union

The Diversity Union’s mission and work is to educate our students about the different backgrounds and viewpoints of other students as well as allowing a bridge for communication among them. Our members strive to be open-minded and respectful of each other’s opinions and beliefs. Although our opinions may differ, our goal is to know each other better and learn from our fellow students by listening to each other.

The club meets every Wednesday at 3 p.m. in room 003. Tom Costello '71 is the moderator.

Resources



Meet Our Team

Meet Our Team

Thomas Costello

Class of 1971
Titles: Director of Multicultural and Inclusion Initiatives
Email:

Most recently, Costello spent the past four years teaching in the School of Communication Studies and serving as a faculty-in-residence at Ohio University. He taught classes in communication among cultures, cross-cultural communication, conflict management, courtroom rhetoric and the Civil Rights Movement. Additionally, he served as the chair of the Scripps College of Communication Diversity Committee.

The majority of Costello's career was as the general counsel for Compuware Corporation for 24 years.

Thomas Costello Full Bio

Meet Our Student Leadership Team

  • Phillip Buckman ’19-Co-President

  • David Nolan ’19-Co-President

  • Cole Brock ’19-Secretary
  • Austin Raymond ’19-Treasurer
  • Ashton Handorf ‘21-Sargent-at-Arms