English

Department Chair: Mr. Daniel Hill - Daniel.Hill@uofdjesuit.org, Ext. 2601


Four credits of required English courses are needed to fulfill the graduation requirement.

Courses in English 2017-2018

English I (1 credit)

This course brings students from diverse backgrounds of instructional experience and knowledge to a degree of uniformity. Focus is on developing competence in: sentence structure and grammar; composing the five-paragraph essay; critical reading and thinking; and familiarity with major literacy forms, elements, and devices.

English II (1 credit)

Continuing the construction of a strong base in English studies, the focus of this American Literature based course moves to mastery of the paragraph and well-supported essay, and the reading and sharpened awareness of increasingly demanding texts. Students are also introduced to the research process for the Junior Research Paper.

Honors English II (1 credit)

Having demonstrated a very high proficiency in English, students are recommended and tested for placement in this course where the demands of reading, writing, and thinking become increasingly intensive. Students will also be introduced to the research process in preparation for the Junior Research Paper.

Prerequisites: 85% or greater in English I for the fist semester, recommendation from current English teacher, and a qualifying score on an English Department test.

Placement testing for the 2017-2018 school year will be offered January 25 @ 2:55 and January 26 @ 7:00 a.m in Room 214. Please contact Mr. Hill with any questions.

English III (1 credit)

Building on the previous years’ material, students will be introduced to major British and other English language writers and literary movements and the ideas and themes manifested by these authors. Students will hone critical reading, thinking and writing skills and learn to express themselves clearly and precisely. The Junior Research Paper will reinforce earlier introduction to literary criticism and establish strong research skills.

Honors English III (1 credit)

Material is covered in greater breadth and depth and students are expected to read widely beyond assignments, write more frequently and at greater length, and demonstrate a greater facility of language usage. The course begins to prepare students for Advanced Placement English IV.

Prerequisites: Preference is given to Honors English II students. For those not in Honors English II a recommendation from the current English teacher or department head and a qualifying score on an English Placement test.

Placement testing for the 2017-2018 school year will be offered December 13 @ 2:55 and December 14 @ 7:00 a.m. in Room 214. Please contact Mr. Hill with any questions.

English IV (1 credit)

Students will engage in a comparative literature course that introduces them to literature world classics. Each unit presents a thematic strand that incorporates poems, short stories, and essays. Selections include works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Tolstoy, and Dante. In preparation for college, students will continue to hone their critical reading, discussion, and academic writing skills.

Advanced Placement English Literature (1 credit)

Well prepared and highly motivated students are challenged to demonstrate college-level reading, composition, and thinking skills through a more intensive course of study. This course prepares students for the AP Exam.

Prerequisites: Preference is given to Honors English III students. For those not in Honors English III a recommendation from the current English teacher or department head and a qualifying score on an English Placement test.

Placement testing for the 2016-2017 school year will be offered December 15 @ 2:55 and December 16 @ 7:00 a.m. Please contact Mr. Hill with any questions.

Course Fee: $94 AP Literature Exam Fee


Electives

Contemporary Literature (0.5 credits)

11th and 12th graders only

The goal of this course is to guide or create students with a passion for reading by experiencing recently published literature and immersing themselves in the voice and voices of today’s authors. Students will be exposed to texts geared toward their interests while also opening them up to different genres and viewpoints. While these titles might be similar to those students would pick up recreationally, they will be guided towards a deeper level of understanding of today’s works through classroom discussion, projects, and academic writing..

Creative Writing (0.5 credits)

11th and 12th graders only

A variety of literary works will form the basis of this study of forms and genres of prose and poetry. Students’ writing will reflect an understanding and application of different writing techniques.

Shakespeare (0.5 credits)

11th and 12th graders only

This one-semester elective will offer an opportunity for juniors and seniors to spend five months immersed in some of the bard’s most well-known works. The main objective of the course will be for students to grown in understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s tragedies, histories, and comedies.

African American Voices (0.5 credits) NEW!!

11th and 12th graders only

This interdisciplinary course offers a narrative about the experience of African Americans, a people who began in chains and then resided in the White House, a people whose freedom struggle continues to this day. We will read, discuss, and write about texts -- poems, novels, essays, songs, films, journalism, autobiographies, and more -- that give voice to the experiences and ideas of African Americans. We will focus on the voices of the past and the present as a way to try and come together when moving forward to the future.

For some, the course may be an exploration of a mostly unfamiliar tradition of writing and body of experience. For others, it may be a study of an an ancestral past and personal reality. Whichever the case may be, all will find inspiration and meaning -- and even a kind of national pride -- in the study of African American literature. As the writer Ralph Ellison suggests, "Whatever else the true American is, he is also somehow black." Ellison continues, "Materially, psychologically, and culturally, part of the nation's heritage is Negro American, and whatever it becomes will be shaped in part by the Negro's presence."

Summer Reading

Book titles and study guides for this summer's readings can be found at this link: Summer Reading